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Scissor #3

February 19, 2015
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Scissor #3 will take place at Nachbarschaftsgalerie, Alt-Treptow, Berlin, on Wednesday, 4th March 2015. It will present the work of Annabel Hesselink (Lunar Gravity Test #2), Maurice Doherty (Waiting To Fall), and Tim Taylor (Domestic Erosion Triptych).

Scissor is an event series dedicated to showing contemporary durational and time-based art, across all media, presented by Kata Kovács and Tom O’Doherty.

Scissor #3

Annabel Hesselink: Lunar Gravity Test #2 (2014)

Excerpts from Lunar Gravity Test #2

Lunar Gravity Test #2 is one of a series of video performances in which Annabel Hesselink searches for a wondrous image of the moon. Her search started during her previous project, Leap in the Dark, for which she collected memories of the first moon landing, and asked people about their idea of the moon. One of the recurring answers she got in these interviews was along these lines: “Well it’s just a grey dead surface, there is nothing there, it’s just a piece of rock.” As a result, Hesselink became curious about whether there would be a possibility to doubt this generally accepted image of the moon; if there is a way to ‘think around’ the few photographs and video images we know of the moon, and to create our own idea of what it could be like up there. With her video performances, Hesselink started a search for the world of not-knowing to open up space for possibilities and wonder.

Annabel Hesselink (born 1987 in Doetinchem, Netherlands) lives and works around the world. She received her Bachelors degree in Photography at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague (2010) and she graduated from the Master program Photography at the AKV St. Joost Academy in Breda (2013). Hesselink works with video and photography.

Her first solo show was Towards a New Moon at Centrum, Berlin (2014). She has been part of international group shows and screenings such as Rosetta Stone, Paleis van Mieris, Amsterdam (2015); Soft Industry, De Liceiras 18, Porto; ProgramaLaPlaza, Medialab Prado, Madrid (screening) (2014); Plat(t)form 2014, Fotomuseum Winterthur (presentation) (2014) and Digging Till The Sun Goes Down, Melkweg Gallery, Amsterdam (2013).

More: annabelhesselink.nl.


Maurice Doherty: Waiting To Fall (2001)

Maurice Doherty: Waiting to Fall
Still from Waiting To Fall

Filmed in 2001, Waiting To Fall is one of Maurice Doherty’s earliest performance/video works. The piece involves the artist standing upright in front of the camera for as long as possible. After 36 hours, Doherty eventually falls through exhaustion. Waiting To Fall captures the final stages of the artist’s experimentation – including the moment of collapse.

Doherty graduated from the University of Ulster, Belfast in 1997 and completed a Masters in Fine Art at the Glasgow School of Art in 2001. Recent group exhibitions include Govanhill Baths, Glasgow, Scotland, Artscape, Baltimore, Jordon/Seydoux Drawings and Prints, Berlin and LAGE EGAL Raum für aktuelle Kunst, Berlin. In 2015, Doherty has forthcoming solo exhibitions at Galerie Four, Baltimore, USA and Maniere Noire Gallery Berlin.

More: mauricedoherty.com.


Tim Taylor: Domestic Erosion Triptych (2003)

Domestic Erosion Triptych
Stills from Domestic Erosion Triptych

Three identical cubes of clear block ice were subjected to the heat of three domestic appliances: a kettle, a hairdryer, and an iron, and the action filmed. This act was both an experiment in form creation and a subversion of function; the former an attempt to render the invisible visible, the latter born of a desire to free these domestic appliances from their humdrum existences. The voids created in each of the blocks were fascinating and unique. Aurally, the iron triumphed, emitting dramatic hisses, crackles and unexpected bursts of steam as the thermostat light clicked on and off.

Tim Taylor’s artwork spans various disparate mediums. These include photography, sculpture, film, installation and performance. His work celebrates the commonplace both as subject and material. Everyday matter such as soap, sand, red wine, salt and domestic paraphernalia are used to effect transformations in appearance, meaning and scale.

He has shown locally and internationally and in a variety of locations and mediums, from gallery-based work to public installation and performance; from the city-wide installation, 100 Gildings, in Ekaterinburg, Russia to the swimming of Edinburgh’s chlorinated river of public and private pools from the hills to the sea in a day.

His most recent project saw the installation of twenty-six permanent works throughout a new, award-winning health centre for families in Glasgow, and he is currently constructing every water tower photographed by celebrated German photographers Hilla and Bernd Becher out of matchsticks.

More: timgtaylor.com.